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Managing Chicken Farms and the Modern Chicken Coop

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Although it may seem any easy task, there is actually a lot of work involved in managing a chicken farm and maintaining a modern chicken coop. When done correctly, all of that work can be worth it. With the modern chicken coop, if both the environmental and nutritional needs of the chickens are being met, one can expect to receive eggs all throughout the year. Here are some tips on how to set up your modern chicken coop to yield the highest production of eggs.
modern chicken coop


First of all, you should build your modern chicken coop away from any other buildings. Whether your coop has a floor, or allows chickens to walk on the ground, you will need to make sure that the floor/ground slopes enough to allow good drainage of any water. It is important that the inside of your coop stays clean and dry. This helps ensure that the chickens stay healthy.

Light fixtures are also important when building your modern chicken coop. These lights should not be too bright, but just bright enough to allow you to see the levels of your chicken feed and water once you enter the coop and let your eyes adjust. It is a good idea to allow most of the light inside your modern chicken coop to come from sunlight. Heat lamps may also be needed in Winter, depending on climate.

You will also want to make sure that you have provided adequate ventilation in your modern chicken coop. The best thing to use on the “walls” is one inch chicken wire. This allows sunlight and air to come into the coop without allowing other animals inside. You will want to make panels out of wood (or other material) which you can close at night and during cold weather. This will keep predators out as well as cold air.

While most chicken farmers will allow their chickens to roam around inside their modern chicken coop, some may prefer to keep them in separate cages inside the coop. This makes maintenance a bit more difficult, as water and food has to be provided to each individual cage. These cages are designed so that they can house from one to three hens each, and built in such a way to allow eggs to simply roll out of the cage and into a container. The chickens in this type of modern chicken coop are typically egg-layers only.

Chickens should be introduced into the modern chicken coop when they are about twenty-two weeks old. At first, it is a good idea to limit the amount of light allowed into the coop with the young pullets. Slowly, the amount of light should be increased, giving them time to adjust. Increasing the light by 15 minutes each week is a good rule of thumb. This “light treatment” helps to encourage the chickens to lay, and helps to set the stage for the to do so all year long. Once the chickens have reached the point where they are used to about seventeen hours a day, their internal clocks will be set to laying when they are given this much light. Use artificial light to make sure that they are continually given this much light a day all throughout the year.

The best feed to give to the chickens in your modern chicken coop is sixteen percent protein laying mash. For those chickens that will be used for breeding, you may want to use a breeder diet that contains higher levels of vitamins. This helps to produce healthier chicks. Up until the age of 16 weeks, you may also want to administer a ration which contains a coccidiostat. This helps prevent an outbreak of coccidiosis.

If any of the chickens in your modern chicken coop stop laying you should first make sure that they are not sick or injured. If neither is the case, then the chicken could be “broody.” This is common in chickens raised in a coop without cages. They will try to nest and not want you to take any eggs that they have. You can fix this issue by simply placing the chicken in a cage for a few days, making sure to feed and water her daily. This will usually break the cycle.